Addictions/Substance Use

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Anxiety

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Child/Adolescent Issues

Using the Patterns of Strengths and Weaknesses (PSW) Model to Identify Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) and Other Learning Problems: Part 1 

Friday, April 27, 2018 
9:00am-3:00pm 

Steven Korner, Ph.D. 

5 CE credits for Psychologists 
Instructional level: appropriate for all levels 

Child study team evaluations have traditionally focused on the determination of eligibility using the ability-discrepancy and response to intervention criteria sanctioned by the special education code. However, current science in the form of CHC theory explains the flaws in these approaches and offers a best practice model, the patterns of strengths and weaknesses, that not only offers a more accurate way to diagnose learning disabilities, but also bridges the gap between assessment and instruction that has developed when eligibility is the sole goal of testing.  

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Review the historical and legal basis of the disconnect between assessment and intervention, including a discussion of the flaws inherent in the Ability-Achievement Discrepancy and Response to Intervention approaches 

  1. Examine the federal “third option” as a consequence of current developments in neuropsychological theory 

  1. Present Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory with a view toward highlighting the linkages between cognitive processing, executive functioning, and academic subjects to bridge the assessment/intervention gap by linking specific cognitive abilities and academic subjects 

  1. Introduce the PSW approach as a best practice model to make differential diagnoses between students with a SLD, ADHD, or those who are low ability performing congruent with their abilities 

Extending the Principles of the PSW Model into the Development of Cross Battery Assessment (XBA) and Instructional Strategies that Put the “I” Back into IEP: Part 2 

The focus of the afternoon session will be to generalize and apply PSW principles to: 

  1. Generate hypotheses about students’ cognitive abilities 

  1. Utilize hypotheses to drive the choose of an appropriate test battery, including the introduction of the idea of Cross Battery Assessment (XBA) 

  1. Review and discuss actual student profiles using PSW and XBA, including a look at the XBA software 

  1. Link test findings to instructional recommendations 

 

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

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Depression

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Developmental Disabilities

Addressing Common Teaching Challenges in Children with Autism  

Friday, March 9, 2018 
9am-12pm 

Lara Delmolino Gatley PhD, BCBA-D 
Catriona Francis M.Ed, BCBA 
Debra Paone, PhD, BCBA-D 

2.75 CE credits for Psychologists 
2.75 CE credits for BCBA/BCABA 
Instructional Level: Intermediate 

Research supports the use of early intensive behavioral intervention using the principles of applied behavior analysis with learners with autism.  With a vast literature that is continually growing, professionals and clinicians can find it overwhelming to stay on top of a changing field in order to best address the needs of their learners. The purpose of this workshop is to equip the clinician with eight essential teaching strategies that are designed to address a variety of common challenges faced by those who work with individuals on the autism spectrum.  These essential strategies are intended to help guide effective instructional practice. The first two strategies, “Make it Worthwhile” and “Don’t Give it Away,” address challenges clinicians may encounter when trying to establish a learner's motivation. “Wait for It,” guides clinicians to address deficits in the area of attending.  “Hands Off” will assist clinicians in identifying appropriate prompting strategies.  “Talk Less,” focuses on how to use language effectively when working with learners on the spectrum.  Finally, “Make it Meaningful,” “Quality over Quantity,” and “Individualize,” will provide the clinician with guidance to plan and implement effective instructional programming for learners with varying profiles.   

Learning Objectives: 

  1. The participants will describe the factors that could interfere with establishing and maintaining a learner's motivation. 

  2. The participants will explain the importance of teaching 'learning to learn' skills.   

  3. The participants will describe how to select appropriate prompt strategies.    

  4. The participants will analyze how to best use language effectively in their interactions with learners on the spectrum.

  5. The participants will identify important considerations when selecting skills to target and structuring a teaching session.    

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Best Practices for Addressing Core Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Wednesday, May 16, 2018
 9:00am-4:00pm

Presenters: Kimberly Sloman, Ph.D., BCBA-D & Kate Fiske, Ph.D., BCBA-D
Location: Center for Applied Psychology, 41 Gordon Road, Suite C, Piscataway NJ

Morning session:

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder demonstrate considerable difficulty in social communication and social interaction skills. In this workshop, we will discuss the ways in which social skills deficits can be addressed using the principles of applied behavior analysis. We will describe how to assess social skills in individuals with ASD, and how to identify and define goals to address in teaching. The use of common behavior analytic teaching strategies such as prompting, skill rehearsal, and reinforcement will be outlined and applied to a range of settings. Additionally, because visual aids are often used successfully to teach social skills for learners with ASD, we will describe how to implement tools such as video models, activity schedules, social stories, scripts, and rule cards in instruction. Finally, alternative relationship-based approaches to teaching social skills will be reviewed and the research bases for those treatments will be considered.

Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: (1) identify and describe procedures common to applied behavior analysis that can be used to teach social skills to individuals with ASD; (2) list ways in which neurotypical peers can be used to teach social skills to learners with ASD in inclusion settings; (3) plan how to use visual cues to teach social skill to a learner with ASD; (4) analyze the evidence base for available treatments for social skills, including those based in behavior analytic and relationship-based approaches. 3 CE Credits

Afternoon session:

Stereotypic behavior, or stereotypy, is a core diagnostic feature of ASD and may include body or hand movements (e.g., hand flapping), object manipulation (e.g., lining up toys), or vocalizations (e.g. saying nonsense words). Research shows that stereotypy may be stigmatizing and greatly impede an individual’s ability to be available for instruction and, thus, may hinder meaningful progress toward independence. This workshop will provide an overview of best practices in behavioral assessment and treatment of stereotypy. We will discuss strategies to progress from less to more intrusive interventions as well as provide a conceptual understanding of how treatments work to decrease stereotypy. 

Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: (1) describe techniques to assess the maintaining variables of stereotypy including traditional functional analysis and functional analysis screening procedures; (2) describe how to conduct a competing stimulus assessment; (3) describe how to implement and list types of environmental enrichment and noncontingent reinforcement treatments; (4) describe how differential reinforcement procedures are used to decrease stereotypy; (5) describe safe and common punishment techniques to decrease stereotypy as well as appropriate ethics, oversight, and reinforcement procedures to use in combination. 3 CE Credits

CREDITS 
6 BCBA/BCABA Continuing Ed. Credits 
6 CE Hours for Psychologists 
Instructional Level: Intermediate

 

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Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

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Diversity

APA Division 51: Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinities & Rutgers Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Present:

Facing The Issues: Masculinities in Research and Practice

Saturday, March 24, 2018
9:00am-5:00pm

Rutgers University Inn and Conference Center
178 Ryders Lane, New Brunswick New Jersey 08901
(732) 932-9144

Up to 4 CE Hours for Psychologists
Instructional Level: Introductory

The Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity, Division 51 of the APA, advances knowledge in the psychology of men through research, education, training, public policy, and improved clinical practice. Research indicates that too often men do not seek out professionals for help and often do not stay in psychotherapy long enough to effect significant change. In addition, few colleges and universities offer coursework and/or applied experiences designed to train students and working professionals to meet the specific needs of men and boys receiving psychotherapy or other mental health services.

The goal of this conference is to provide an opportunity for mental health professionals to integrate into practice many important dynamics involved in the effective psychological treatment of men and boys. 

Participants in this one-day conference will learn to:

  • Formulate and apply ways to increase compassion and self-compassion into viable therapeutic outcomes with men. Keynote speaker: Dr. Dennis Tirch, Founder, The Center for Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT).
     
  • Develop methods and language for men and women to identify, collaborate, discuss, and reduce the sexual harassment of women. Facilitator, Dr. Holly Sweet, Immediate Past-President of Division 51 and Co-Founder of the Cambridge Center for Gender Relations.
     
  • Identify and design male-friendly, non-traditional treatment approaches that encourage men to seek and find needed emotional support. Facilitator: Dr. Ed Adams, President, Division 51, Founder of Men Mentoring Men, and GSAPP graduate.
     
  • Relate and integrate positive psychology approaches into the treatment of men and boys. Facilitator: Dr. Brian Cole, Assistant Professor, Counseling Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
     
  • Devise effective therapy approaches to empower historically marginalized adolescent boys and young men. Facilitators: Dr. Christopher Reigeluth, Assistant Professor, PsyD Clinical program, Pacific University-Oregon & Dr. Bill Johnson, Staff Psychologist, DePaul University Counseling Services.

 

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Domestic Violence

A Workshop on Domestic Violence 

Saturday, April 28, 2018 
8:30am-1:30pm 

Elisabeth Brown, PsyD & Alan Groveman PhD 

4 CE credits for Psychologists 
Instructional Level: Introductory 

The workshop is structured to fully meet the four CE credits in Domestic Violence required to renew your psychology license in the biennial period 2017-2019 

Workshop Learning Objectives: 

  1. Define six specific areas of domestic violence 

  1. Identify four effects of family violence across the lifespan 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of state (home state) law and socials services agencies by listing four state agencies and three not-for-profit organizations that victims of domestic abuse can contact for supportive services 

  1. Describe four cultural factors that influence the occurrence and patterns of and responses to family violence in domestic violence 

  1. Identify five potential mental health effects persisting into adult life after childhood experience of abuse or family violence 

  1. Identify five research articles that demonstrate the effectiveness of psychological interventions in cases of domestic violence 
     

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Eating Disorders

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Ethics and Professional Issues

Legal Issues in Psychological Practice

Friday, March 23, 2018
10am-1pm

Presenter: James Wulach, PhD, JD

3 CE Credits
Instructional level: Introductory

This presentation will review current laws and regulations affecting NJ psychologists, emphasizing current developments, and those regulations and situations that create the highest legal risk for psychologists in clinical and forensic practice.  Past decisions of the NJ State Board will be summarized and reviewed, in terms of disciplinary trends and common pitfalls to avoid.  Risk avoidance strategies will be discussed, including procedures, and likely outcomes of unexpected Board complaints, lawsuits, and their resolution.

This workshop is designed to help you:

1.    Summarize 5 NJ laws or regulations that pose high-risk for Board complaints or lawsuits.
2.    Describe 5 common errors that psychologists make that result in legal action.
3.    Articulate 5 risk avoidance strategies to remain free of legal cross-hairs.
4.    Explain typical legal risk factors and strategies in working with families and children of divorce
5.    Summarize legal issues and clinical strategies surrounding boundary issues with borderline patients
 

 

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Writing Forensic Reports of Minors Alleged to Have Experienced Maltreatment 

Friday, April 20, 2018 
12:00pm-4:30pm 

Daniel Bromberg, Ph.D. 

4 CE credits for Psychologists 
Instructional Level: Intermediate 

Forensic psychological reports vary widely in their form, content, and utility to readers. Such reports should assist readers both in answering psycholegal questions and should result in recommendations for services and/or placements tailored to the specific needs of the minor evaluated. Attendees will learn about forensic evaluation reports that also function as a “prescription for intervention.” Best practices in forensic report writing will be presented with an emphasis on writing for audiences in the State of New Jersey (e.g., DCP&P and family court judges). 

Learning objectives: 

  1. Define “forensic psychological evaluation” and describe both similarities and differences in reports resulting from forensic and non-forensic evaluations. 

  1. Describe the range of referral questions that may be addressed in such evaluations. 

  1. List typical components/sections of such reports. 

  1. List psycholegal issues and language that family court judges expect will be included and addressed. 

  1. Draw conclusions and make recommendations based on discrepant data obtained during the evaluation. 

 

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Forensic Issues

Writing Forensic Reports of Minors Alleged to Have Experienced Maltreatment 

Friday, April 20, 2018 
12:00pm-4:30pm 

Daniel Bromberg, Ph.D. 

4 CE credits for Psychologists 
Instructional Level: Intermediate 

Forensic psychological reports vary widely in their form, content, and utility to readers. Such reports should assist readers both in answering psycholegal questions and should result in recommendations for services and/or placements tailored to the specific needs of the minor evaluated. Attendees will learn about forensic evaluation reports that also function as a “prescription for intervention.” Best practices in forensic report writing will be presented with an emphasis on writing for audiences in the State of New Jersey (e.g., DCP&P and family court judges). 

Learning objectives: 

  1. Define “forensic psychological evaluation” and describe both similarities and differences in reports resulting from forensic and non-forensic evaluations. 

  1. Describe the range of referral questions that may be addressed in such evaluations. 

  1. List typical components/sections of such reports. 

  1. List psycholegal issues and language that family court judges expect will be included and addressed. 

  1. Draw conclusions and make recommendations based on discrepant data obtained during the evaluation. 

 

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Gender/Sexual Identity

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Mindfulness

Introduction to Mindfulness and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: Turning Towards the Present Moment 

Friday, May 4, 2018 
9:00am-3:00pm 

Ken Verni, Psy.D. 

5 CE credits for Psychologists 
Instructional level: Introductory 

“Between stimulus and response, there is a space.  In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom” 

Victor Frankl, M.D. 

Mindfulness Practice is often defined as the process of paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, without judgment.  We all have this innate capacity to be aware of what is happening within us and around us. However, this present-centered awareness is often overshadowed by our habits of judging our experience, worrying about the future or re-working the past and becoming desensitized to the body’s wisdom.  When we are lost in the swirl of thoughts, we are more prone to periods of reactivity in response to both internal and external events and feeling overwhelmed by the situations we find ourselves in. Mindfulness practice facilitates our ability to respond instead of react when faced with personal and interpersonal stressors. Participants in this training will gain a first-hand experiential introduction to actual mindfulness practices involving breathing and gentle body movements and methods for incorporating mindfulness practices into their everyday as well as an opportunity to relate that personal experience to the growing body of theory and research that is placing mindfulness-based interventions on the cutting edge of strength based efforts to promote health, balance, and well-being in the midst of the challenges we face as human beings in a modern age.  

The goal of this training is to provide an experiential and conceptual framework from which to explore the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction in both professional and personal contexts. Please note:  This is a highly participatory training that will involve experiential exercises in breath awareness, intentional silence, and gentle focused movement as a means to give participants first-hand experience with present centered awareness. 

Learning Objectives: 

Participants will be able to: 

  1. Define Mindfulness both conceptually and experientially. 

  1. Describe specific Mindfulness practices, including both formal and informal mindfulness practice. 

  1. List underlying psychological and neuroscientific factors associated with the positive impact of mindfulness practice. 

  1. Discuss relationship between Mindfulness Practice and Stress Reduction and Enhanced Resilience and overall wellness. 

  1. Summarize empirical evidence that supports Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction as an evidenced based practice 

 

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Motivational Interviewing

Motivational Interviewing 

Saturday, May 5, 2018 
9:00am-3:00pm 

Michelle Drapkin, Ph.D. 

6 CE credits for Psychologists 
Instructional level: Introductory to Intermediate 

We have at our disposal an array of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for a variety of disorders  (e.g., depression, PTSD, OCD, etc.). However, there is a significant proportion of clients who have difficulties engaging in those EBPs. A motivational interviewing approach (MI) may help resolve ambivalence related to EBP engagement. MI is defined as “a collaborative conversation style for strengthening a person’s own motivation and commitment to change” (Miller and Rollnick, 2012). Integrating and overlaying this MI style onto an EBP can help overcome engagement challenges (e.g., homework completion) and continue to move individuals in the direction of change. There is also value in using MI as a prelude to an EBP to shore up motivation and to facilitate engagement in the EBP.  The purpose of this workshop will be to describe MI and introduce participants to some of the basic skills. In addition, we will discuss applications of MI in other disorders commonly comorbid with substance use disorders. Dr. Drapkin will also be available for individual consultation and discussion. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Identify treatment components associated with Motivational Interviewing (MI) 

  1. Describe how MI might benefit clients with other comorbid disorders 

  1. Review the current and past investigations of incorporation MI into other EBPs 

 

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Psychoanalysis

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Somatic Issues

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Trauma

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Veteran Affairs

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